References

“Do I need to shiver to lose weight?”

  • And you do shiver. And if you want the intense cold thermogenesis, you want to get to the point where you’re shivering. – Ben Greenfield, tri-athlete – Episode 294 – How Many Calories Do You Burn With Cold Thermogenesis
  • There are two factors that could cause energy expenditure to increase with falling outdoor temperature. First, if shivering is elicited by cold, then energy expenditure increases. However, different people have differing shivering-response sensitivity, and intensity of shivering will be influenced by magnitude of decrease in body (deep core and skin) temperature, which in turn is influenced by body size and fat content that vary widely among people, as well as clothing worn. – Andrew J. Young PhD, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, MA
  • Hardcore intensity always involves shivering, which burns massive amounts of calories. When tested using indirect calorimetry, shivering was able to triple calorie burn, and that was just with subtle, low-level interval shivering, also known as “shiver surfing”…despite what many “experts” have claimed, shivering does not turn off brown fat. In fact, shivering probably increases BAT faster than any other method. – Ben Greenfield, tri-athlete – T Nation: Cold Temps For A Hot Body
  • Although the anatomical site has been discussed for many years, and is still being discussed, it is our contention that non-shivering thermogenesis solely derives from the activity of brown adipose tissue and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in that tissue. In mammals that remain in the cold for a prolonged period brown adipose tissue will be recruited and the animals will no longer have to shiver to produce heat. – Barbara Cannon and Jan Nedergaard, Thermogenesis challenges the adipostat hypothesis for body-weight control

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“How cold should the water be? How much ice do I need to use?”

  • Get the water between 50-55 degrees. – Dr. Jack Kruse, Cold Thermogenesis Easy Start Guide
  • If you have access to skin thermometers (I did) that an anesthesiologist would normally use during a surgery, the key thing you are looking to do is get your skin surface temp to 50-55 degrees. – Dr. Jack Kruse, The Cold Thermogenesis Protocol: What is the Next Step in the Evolution of the Leptin Rx?
  • At the lowest level, we have “casual” intensity. This would be like sitting in a 66-degree room with minimal clothing. Cooled off, but not cold, per se….[For moderate cold thermogenesis] this would be like sitting in a 50-60 degree room while only wearing shorts (and a bra, for women). – Ben Greenfield, tri-athlete – T Nation: Cold Temps For A Hot Body
  • I placed two ten-pound bags of ice in a cold-water bath and submerged myself for a total of 20 minutes. Those 20-minutes were phased as follows: 0:00-10:00 minutes – up to mid-waist, legs submerged, torso and arms not submerged; 10:00-15:00 minutes – submerged up to neck with hands out of the water (sitting cross-legged then reclining makes this easier in a standard bathtub); 15:00-20:00 minutes – submerged up to neck, hands underwater. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 128

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“How long should I take an ice bath for? How long should I take a cold shower for?”

  • I placed two ten-pound bags of ice in a cold-water bath and submerged myself for a total of 20 minutes. Those 20-minutes were phased as follows: 0:00-10:00 minutes – up to mid-waist, legs submerged, torso and arms not submerged; 10:00-15:00 minutes – submerged up to neck with hands out of the water (sitting cross-legged then reclining makes this easier in a standard bathtub); 15:00-20:00 minutes – submerged up to neck, hands underwater. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 128
  • I placed an ice pack on the back of my neck and upper trapezius area for 30 minutes, generally in the evening, when my insulin sensitivity is lower than in the morning. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 129
  • Place an ice pack on the back of the neck or upper trapezius area for 20-30 minutes, preferably in the evening, when insulin sensitivity is lowest. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 130
  • Take 5-10 minute cold showers before breakfast and/or before bed. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 130
  • If you’re impatient and can tolerate more, take 20-minute baths that induce shivering. – Tim Ferriss, The 4-Hour Body, Pg. 130
  • Another example for this would be, swimming in cold water for a long time. Like going for a 20, 30 plus minutes swim in water. – Ben Greenfield, tri-athlete – Episode 294 – How Many Calories Do You Burn With Cold Thermogenesis
  • After you can get past 45 minutes of this [ice baths], you will notice your tolerance to cold dramatically changes in water, air, and in ice….I just jump into the lake for a 10-20 minutes from my neck down. I pay attention to my skin color as I do this. – Dr. Jack Kruse, The Cold Thermogenesis Protocol: What is the Next Step in the Evolution of the Leptin Rx?
  • [Compression Shirt & Ice] Try to extend your time 5 minutes a time until you get to 60 minutes…. If you can complete the 60 minutes- remove the compression shirt and place the bag of ice directly on the skin….[Ice Baths] If you can complete the 60 minutes- remove the compression shirtand place the bag of ice directly on the skin….[Fully Body Immersion, No Ice] Stay for 10-20 minutes. – Dr. Jack Kruse, Cold Thermogenesis Easy Start Guide

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“Can this be bad for the heart?” (Risks of cold therapy)

  • At first, cold skin and a prickling feeling; numbness; red, white, bluish-white or grayish-yellow skin; hard or waxy-looking skin; clumsiness due to joint and muscle stiffness; blistering after rewarming, in severe cases – Mayo Clinic, Frostbite: Symptoms
  • Protect your skin from further exposure. If you’re outside, warm frostbitten hands by tucking them into your armpits. Protect your face, nose or ears by covering the area with dry, gloved hands. Don’t rub the affected area and never rub snow on frostbitten skin….Gently rewarm frostbitten areas. Soak hands or feet in warm water — 99 to 108 F (37 to 42 C) — for 15 to 30 minutes. If a thermometer isn’t available, test the water by placing an uninjured hand or elbow in it — it should feel very warm — not hot. – Mayo Clinic, Frostbite: First Aid
  • CAUTION: If you have a serious health condition, please consult a medical doctor before beginning a CT regimen. Immediately stop treatment if you experience light-headedness or a pale pink to white coloration of the skin. – Dr. Jack Kruse, Cold Thermogenesis Easy Start Guide
  • Before you begin, you must make sure your cardiac risks are low and talk things over with your doctor and family. Most people will have no trouble doing this at home. – Dr. Jack Kruse, The Evolution of the Leptin RX
  • Chilblains are the painful inflammation of small blood vessels in your skin that occur in response to sudden warming from cold temperatures. Also known as pernio, chilblains can cause itching, red patches, swelling and blistering on extremities, such as on your toes, fingers, ears and nose. Chilblains may get better on its own, especially as the weather gets warmer. Chilblains usually clear up within one to three weeks, though they may recur seasonally for years. Treatments typically consist of lotions and medication. While Chilblains don’t usually result in permanent injury, they can lead to infection, which may cause severe damage if left untreated. The best approach to chilblains is to avoid developing them by limiting your exposure to cold, dressing warmly and covering exposed skin. – Mayo Clinic, Chilblains: Definition

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